GENEWATCH
 
Volume 23 Issue 5
 
 
Volume 23 Issue 5
Gene Patents
Oct-Dec 2010
 
Genes, Patents, Common Sense and the Law
By James Evans
 
When the Grass Eats the Cows
By John Conley, Dan Vorhaus
 
Is Government Getting Out of the Ethics Business?
By Jeremy Gruber
 
The Plaintiffs
By CRG staff - Interview with Sandra Park, ACLU
 
The Defendants
By CRG staff - interview with Richard Marsh, Myriad Genetics
 
Protecting the Intellectual Foundations of Genetic Science
By Eileen Kane
 
The Danger of the Broad Brush
By Christopher M. Holman
 
The Overstated Case
By Robert Cook-Deegan
 
The Sky Is Not Falling
By CRG staff - interview with Daniel Ravicher, Public Patent Foundation
 
Why Banning Patents Would Hurt Patients
By Sharon Terry
 
The Physical Embodiment of Information
By Magdalina Gugucheva
 
A Return to Judging
By Michele Goodwin
 
Why Genes Must Remain Eligible for Patenting
By Kevin Noonan
 
Naturally Occurring Genes and the Commons by Necessity
By David Koepsell
 
Foiling Gene Patents: The Salzberg Screen
By CRG staff - interview with Steven Salzberg
 
In Defense of a Working Good
By Paul Billings
 
Freedom of Genes
By Debra Greenfield
 
Patents on Genes, Organisms - and Human(oid)s?
By Stuart Newman
 
Synthetic Biology: The Next Wave of Patents on Life
By Jaydee Hanson, Eric Hoffman
 
EEOC Issues Strong Final Rule Implementing GINA
By Jeremy Gruber
 
Dangerous Harvest
By Diane Beeson
 
Reproductive Trafficking
By Hedva Eyal
 
Film Review: Eggsploitation
By Kathleen Sloan
 
Topic Updates: DNA Alarm Systems, Sickle Cell Testing, GM Mosquitoes
By CRG Staff
 
Dedication: Paul Steven Miller
By Jeremy Gruber
 
Editor's Note
By Samuel W. Anderson
 
 
Search: GeneWatch
 
 
 
The Gene Myths series features incisive, succinct articles by leading scientists disputing the exaggerations and misrepresentations of the power of genes.
 
View Project
 
 
Created in 1999 by the Council for Responsible Genetics, the Safe Seed Pledge helps to connect non-GM seed sellers,distributors and traders to the growing market of concerned gardeners and agricultural consumers. The Pledge allows businesses and individuals to declare that they "do not knowingly buy, sell or trade genetically engineered seeds," thus assuring consumers of their commitment.
 
View Project
 
 
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