Pentagon Mistakenly Sends Live Anthrax Samples to Labs Across the Country

by jeeg 28. May 2015 22:20
  The Pentagon announced on Wednesday it had mistakenly sent as many as nine samples of live anthrax to labs across the country, and one internationally. Presumably the announcement was made sheepishly; it’s not a great look for the keeper of America’s nuclear arsenal. A lab in Maryland is the only confirmed recipient of a batch of live samples that was shipped from a Utah army facility known for biological and chemical weapons defense testing. The samples were m... [More]

A Note on Genome Editing

by jeeg 27. May 2015 23:46
Last week, the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) and its National Academy of Medicine (NAM) announced that they will convene an international meeting this fall at which researchers, ethicists, and other experts will discuss the implications of human germline gene-editing technologies in both research and clinical applications. The White House applauds NAS and NAM for convening this dialogue and fully supports a robust review of the ethical issues associated with using gene-editing tech... [More]

Weighing The Promises Of Big Genomics

by jeeg 22. May 2015 23:41
  “Success in sight: The eyes have it!” Thus the scientific journal Gene Therapy greeted the news, in 2008, that an experimental treatment was restoring vision to 12 people born with a congenital disorder that slowly left them blind. Healthy genes were injected to replace the faulty mutations in the patients’ retinas, allowing an 8-year-old to ride a bike for the first time. A mother finally saw her child play softball. Every patient, the researchers reported, showed &l... [More]

Eugenics lurk in the shadow of CRISPR

by jeeg 22. May 2015 23:28
  IN CALLING THEIR Perspective “A prudent path forward for genomic engineering and germline gene modification” (3 April, p. 36; published online 19 March), D. Baltimore et al. show at once the size of the problem and the modesty of their response to it.  CRISPR-Cas9, invented by the ninth author, Jennifer Doudna, allows the alteration of specific DNA in the mammalian genome. The authors say that “CRISPR-Cas9 technology, as well as other genome engineering method... [More]

If Canada does not act to protect genetic data, we could see the rise of genetic discrimination

by jeeg 21. May 2015 23:27
  Earlier this month the Senate Human Rights Committee gutted a bill calling for a law against genetic discrimination in Canada. Instead of protecting Canadians from having their personal genetic information used against them, the bill now simply provides a definition of “disclose” and “genetic test,” and protects no one. More than 26,000 genetic tests are now available to the public. Many do-it-yourself tests, like those offered by mail from the California-based... [More]

U.S. science leaders to tackle ethics of gene-editing technology

by jeeg 19. May 2015 23:27
  The leading U.S. scientific organization, responding to concerns expressed by scientists and ethicists, has launched an ambitious initiative to recommend guidelines for new genetic technology that has the potential to create "designer babies." The technology, called CRISPR-Cas9, allows scientists to edit virtually any gene they target. The technique is akin to a biological word-processing program that finds and replaces genetic defects. The technique has taken biology by storm, ... [More]

Creepy Ads Use Litterbugs’ DNA to Shame Them Publicly

by jeeg 18. May 2015 21:05
  Next time you’re about to toss a cigarette butt on the ground, consider this freaky fact: It takes less than a nanogram (or less than one billionth of the mass of a penny) of your dried saliva for scientists to construct a digital portrait that bears an uncanny resemblance to your very own face. For proof look to Hong Kong, where a recent ad campaign takes advantage of phenotyping, the prediction of physical appearance based on bits of DNA, to publicly shame people who have li... [More]

Newborn screening collides with privacy fears

by jeeg 16. May 2015 00:59
  The wrinkled heel of nearly every baby in the United States is pricked at birth, and a few drops of blood are dabbed on filter paper and shipped off for analysis. Started in the 1960s, this newborn screening program tests for more than 30 rare and serious diseases that are treatable if caught early in life. Now, many public health experts who help run or advise the program are worried what the future holds. A new law shaped by a coalition of privacy advocates and conservative politicia... [More]

It’s Time to Require Labels for GMOs

by jeeg 16. May 2015 00:29
  The decision by Chipotle to stop using genetically modified foods is only the latest examples of the effects of public concerns about technologically altered foods. This decisions was predictable: Once the industry convinced the Food and Drug Administration that GMOs should not be required to be labeled as such, public backlash was only a matter of time. I’m only surprised that it took 20 years to get to this point. I was a member of the FDA Food Advisory Committee when the agen... [More]

Here’s how Apple, Google, and Microsoft are trying to get inside your genes-CRG in the News

by jeeg 13. May 2015 23:50
  Not satisfied by having our emails, chats, status updates, search histories, clicking behaviors, and shopping preferences, some of Silicon Valley’s most powerful tech titans are in an arms race to get access to your most personal information: your DNA. Last week, for instance, the MIT Technology Review reported that Apple was looking to integrate genetic data into studies that run atop its new open-source research platform, ResearchKit. That should come as no surprise. There&rsq... [More]
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